Saved (2009)

Julia finds herself obsessively advocating for a young refugee, risking her reputation and marriage; but his identity is in question as cracks in his story emerge.

Sex with a Smile (1976)

Sex with a Smile is a 1976 Italian comedy film starring Marty Feldman, Barbara Bouchet, Edwige Fenech, Dayle Haddon and directed by Sergio Martino. While the cast was relatively popular internationally, advertising for the film in the U.S. concentrated almost exclusively on Marty Feldman, even though he only appeared in one segment of the film. The original Italian title was 40 gradi all'ombra del lenzuolo, colloquially translatable as 104 Degrees Under the Sheets (40 degrees Celsius equals 104 degrees Fahrenheit). It was followed by a sequel entitled Spogliamoci così senza pudor, colloquially translatable as Let's Get This Naked without Modesty.

Sex and Zen (1991)

A raunchy Cat III comedy full of sex, hijinks, and inadvisable surgeries! While his wife enjoys regular trysts of her own, a scholar comes under a thief’s tutelage in order to learn how to seduce married women.

Going Places (1974)

A shockingly hilarious sex comedy, GOING PLACES exposes the outrageous desires of a pair of perpetually horny twenty-something brutes, Jean-Claude (Gerard Depardieu, in the role that made him a star) and Pierrot (Patrick Dewaere).

Love (2015)

Love is a 2015 French 3D erotic romantic drama film written and directed by Gaspar Noé. The film marked Noe's fourth directorial venture after a gap of five years.

A Woman's Nightmare (2018)

A woman is haunted by the brief affair that she had while separated from her husband. With her scorned lover refusing to give up, she must fight to keep her family and her secret safe.

Too Close to Our Son (2015)

Au plus près du Soleil is a 2015 French drama film directed by Yves Angelo and co-written by Angelo, François Dupeyron and Gilles Legrand.

Halfaouine: Boy of the Terraces (1990)

Halfaouine child of the terraces is a Tunisian film made in 1990, first feature film of fiction by the director Ferid Boughedir.

Lolita (1997)

Urbane professor Humbert Humbert (Jeremy Irons) marries a New England widow (Melanie Griffith) to be near her nymphet daughter.

Nest of Vipers (1978)

Ritratto di borghesia in nero (also known as Nest of Vipers and Portrait of a Bourgeois in Black) is a 1978 Italian drama film directed by Tonino Cervi. It is based on the short story The Piano Teacher by Roger Peyrefitte.

Dead Sexy (2018)

Three young women are about to encounter a paranormal force that is going to make them question the need for the opposite sex.

Deseo (2013)

Eight short stories tell of seduction and illicit encounters between lovers in the cosmopolitan atmosphere of a Mexican city.

Transformers (2007)

An ancient struggle re-erupts on Earth between two extraterrestrial clans, the heroic Autobots and the evil Decepticons, with a clue to the ultimate power held by a young teenager.

Forbidden Planet (1956)

Forbidden Planet (also known as Fatal Planet) is a 1956 American science fiction film from MGM, produced by Nicholas Nayfack, directed by Fred M. Wilcox and starring Walter Pidgeon, Anne Francis, Leslie Nielsen, Warren Stevens, Jack Kelly and Robby the Robot. Shot in Eastmancolor and CinemaScope, it is considered one of the great science fiction films of the 1950s, a precursor of what was to come for science fiction cinema. The characters and isolated setting have been compared to those in William Shakespeare's The Tempest. Its plot contains certain story analogues to the play. Forbidden Planet is noted for pioneering several aspects of science fiction cinema. For instance, it was the first science fiction picture to depict humans traveling in a faster-than-light starship of their own creation. It was also the first to be set entirely on another planet in interstellar space, far away from Earth. Outside of science fiction, the film was groundbreaking as the first of any genre to use an entirely electronic musical score, courtesy of Bebe and Louis Barron. The Robby the Robot character is also one of the first film robots that was more than just a mechanical "tin can" on legs; Robby displays a distinct personality and is an integral supporting character in the film. Forbidden Planet's effects team was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Visual Effects at the 29th Academy Awards. In 2013, the picture was entered into the Library of Congress' National Film Registry, being deemed "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".

Star Trek (2009)

Star Trek is a 2009 American science fiction adventure film directed by J. J. Abrams, written by Roberto Orci and Alex Kurtzman and distributed by Paramount Pictures. It is the 11th film of the Star Trek film franchise and is also a reboot that features the main characters of the original Star Trek television series, portrayed by a new cast and the first in the reboot series. The film follows James T. Kirk (Chris Pine) and Spock (Zachary Quinto) aboard the USS Enterprise as they combat Nero (Eric Bana), a Romulan from their future who threatens the United Federation of Planets. The story takes place in an alternate reality because of time travel by both Nero and the original Spock (Leonard Nimoy). The alternate timeline was created in an attempt to free the film and the franchise from established continuity constraints while simultaneously preserving original story elements. The idea for a prequel film which would follow the Star Trek characters during their time in Starfleet Academy was discussed by series creator Gene Roddenberry in 1968. The concept resurfaced in the late 1980s, when it was postulated by Harve Bennett as a possible plotline for the movie that would become Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country, but was rejected in lieu of other projects by Roddenberry. Following the critical and commercial failure of Star Trek: Nemesis and the cancellation of the television series Star Trek: Enterprise, franchise executive producer Rick Berman and screenwriter Erik Jendresen wrote an unproduced film, titled Star Trek: The Beginning, which would take place after Enterprise. After the separation between Viacom and CBS Corporation, former Paramount president Gail Berman convinced CBS to produce a feature film. Orci and Kurtzman, both fans of the Star Trek series, were approached to write the film and Abrams was approached to direct it. Kurtzman and Orci used inspiration from novels and graduate school dissertations as well as the series itself. Principal photography commenced on November 7, 2007 and ended on March 27, 2008. The film was shot in various locations around California and Utah. Abrams wanted to avoid using bluescreen and greenscreen, opting to use sets and locations instead. Heavy secrecy surrounded the film's production and was under the fake working title Corporate Headquarters. Industrial Light & Magic used digital ships for the film, as opposed to the previous films in the franchise. Production for the film concluded by the end of 2008. Star Trek was heavily promoted the months preceding its release; pre-release screenings for the film premiered in select cities around the world including Austin, Texas; Sydney, Australia; and Calgary, Alberta. It was released in the United States and Canada on May 8, 2009, to positive reviews. Critics praised the character development as well as the storyline in the film. Star Trek became a box office success, grossing over $385.7 million worldwide. It was nominated for several awards, including four Academy Awards at the 82nd Academy Awards, ultimately winning in the category for Best Makeup, making it the first Star Trek film to win an Academy Award. The DVD and Blu-ray for the film were released on October 19, 2010. The film is followed by two sequels, Star Trek Into Darkness (2013) and Star Trek Beyond (2016) with a fourth having been announced.

Taste of Cherry (1997)

The first Iranian film to win the Palme d’Or, this austere, emotionally complex drama by the great Abbas Kiarostami follows the middle-aged Mr. Badii (Homayoun Ershadi) as he drives around the hilly outskirts of Tehran looking for someone who will agree to dispose of his body after he commits suicide, a taboo under Islam. Extended conversations with three passengers (a soldier, a seminarian, and a taxidermist) elicit different views of mortality and individual choice. Operating at once as a closely observed, realistic story and a fable populated by archetypal figures, Taste of Cherry challenges the viewer to consider what often goes unexamined in everyday life.